Essential Dharmas of Daily Practice

1. The mind is originally free from disturbance, but disturbances arise in response to sensory conditions; let us restore the equanimity of our true nature by letting go of disturbances.


2. The mind is originally free from delusion, but delusions arise in response to sensory conditions; let us restore the wisdom of our true nature by letting go of delusions.
 

3. The mind is originally free from wrong-doing, but wrong-doings arise in response to sensory conditions; let us restore the precepts of our true nature by letting go of wrong-doings.

 

4. Let us replace disbelief, greed, laziness, and ignorance with belief, zeal, questioning, and dedication.
 

5. Let us turn resentment into gratitude.
 

6. Let us turn dependency into self- reliance.
 

7. Let us turn a reluctance to learn into a willingness to learn well.
 

8. Let us turn a reluctance to teach into a willingness to teach well.
 

9. Let us turn a lack of public spirit into an eagerness to serve the good of all.
 

Fourfold Grace

I bow in gratitude to the Grace of Heaven and Earth,

honoring the infinite beneficence of nature and the universe.

I bow in gratitude to the Grace of Parents,

honoring the beneficence from parents, ancestors, and all those who have had a nurturing role in my life.

 

I bow in gratitude to the Grace of Fellow Beings,

recognizing the truth of interconnectedness.

 

I bow in gratitude to the Grace of Laws,

which guides us, protects us, and promotes justice.